fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.
fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film
it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.
she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.
and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.’
the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.
and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.
goddamn i love this sequence so much.

fairymascot:

yes hello i would like to talk about how elsa throwing away her crown is one of my favorite sequences of animation in the entire film

it’s just so incredibly expressive, and even though it’s only a few seconds long, there is such an amazing progression of emotion in her face and body language, it’s nuts.

she starts out staring ahead of her, expression tight, as the idea begins to form in her mind (1). she takes off her crown and looks at it— and for a moment she makes this face like she doesn’t even know what she’s feeling (2). and then the anguish creeps into her expression, the weight of what it represents setting in in full: the life she’ll be leaving behind, the duty she’ll abandon (3). elsa looks down at it and she sets her jaw (4) and for a solid second her face is pure resentment, because she is seeing exactly what this crown stands for, and to her in this moment, it is nothing but a horrible, horrible burden.

and then she bares her teeth (5) in something between a grimace and a grin, something primal and wild that’s never crossed her face before and never crosses it again, brought on by the wide-eyed realization that she doesn’t need to carry this burden anymore. there’s anger at the life she’s been made to live, and there’s joy at finding the freedom to finally leave it behind. it almost seems triumphant. ‘take that.

the moment she moves to throw it away (6, 7), the anger dissipates, all the negative emotion is gone, and only pure, unadulterated glee remains. when you get a good look at her face (8) her eyebrows are quirked up in a way that looks like she herself can’t quite contain the joy she is feeling, doesn’t know how to process this weight being cast off her shoulders.

and she is so excited and so light and so free, that in the end of it, she does a hop. she balls her hands up at the sides of her body and screws her eyes shut through the force of her grin and she fucking hops, it is so childlike and alive and fantastic.

goddamn i love this sequence so much.

canwejusttalkaboutfrozen:

Can we just talk about when Elsa remade Olaf during the Let It Go sequence?

image

The entire number is very much about Elsa casting aside the restrictions and fears she’d been living with, allowing herself the freedom to do as she wants with her power, to create what she wants, and to feel things that she couldn’t let herself feel. So it resonates so strongly with me during the sequence that after a few snowflakes, the first thing Elsa really creates with her power is a snowman.

Not just any snowman, but a replica of the snowman she’d built with Anna before their lives had changed so drastically.

image

Elsa spent years staying away from Anna and though the movie does well to showcase just how much Elsa loves her sister, I think her creation of Olaf really drives home just how strong that love is.

In a single moment she uses her magic to create this snowman and then she continues on building this amazing castle without even realizing that the snowman, the tribute to an old memory of a time before all the closed doors and heartache, had come to life.

And not only did Olaf become a living being, but he became one who smiled almost constantly, who loved warm hugs and the thought of blue skies in summer. He found his way right to Anna, to the person who mattered so much to Elsa, and throughout the whole of the film you can see that Olaf cares for Anna a great deal. He latched on to her easily, followed her on her journey, cared for her well-being, and was willing to melt to stay beside Anna when she was in trouble.

image

It may have been unintentional on her part upon his creation during Let It Go, but I believe Olaf was very much a manifestation of Elsa’s love for her sister. The moment she stops holding herself back is the moment when she gives life and warmth to something she built based on a memory and because of that, regardless of his silliness and his comic relief role, I think Olaf is not only an incredibly important part of Frozen, but also an important part of the relationship between the two sisters. Elsa really did want to build a snowman during all of those lonely years, wanted to build one with Anna, and when she leaves her life behind after her powers are exposed, building a snowman is the first thing she does.

I dunno if they thought of all this when they made the movie or more specifically when they made Olaf, but it just comes across to me as another method of showcasing the bond between Elsa and Anna.

image

And holy crap does it give me feels.

This movie, good god.

onaveridiansea:

counterpunches:

peachdoxie:



I think it must be a thing that if you have ice powers and white hair that you must have a flashback to a painful memory involving the younger sister you love dearly that is done via transition through the eyes




Except I’ll bet anything that Elsa’s constantly lived her life in triggering flashbacks. Her entire way of life is structured around that moment, practically guaranteeing PTDS attacks and symptoms on a daily basis.
There’s never been one moment that she forgot and I’ll bet you fifty bucks she had an episode right here, too:

It happens much more quickly than the time in the ice castle, but let’s pause to remember how these things actually work. In real life and in real time, we don’t get flashback montages, people just get waves of crippling panic and fear that attack in an instant. It’s all happening in the breath of a second for Elsa. The instant she remembers why it can’t be like this all the time is because she sees Anna fall all over again (and again and again and again) and it sobers Elsa instantly. There’s a tiny sliver of abject fear in Elsa’s eyes as they widen before regret and sadness take over once more. But it’s there and it’s what strengthens her resolve to shut Anna out once more, even though it kills her. 

Emphasis mine.
It’s there. My god, it’s there.
Look closely. The focus of her eyes shift, while still looking at her sister. Her irises shift minutely to the side while her eyelids widen. Then she drops her gaze downward and further to the side, before lowering her eyelids again.
It’s only a sliver of a second, but it is there.
In succession, we have the following eye movements, and their related cognitive significance:
Eyes Straight Ahead, but Defocused or Dilated: Quick access of almost any sensory information; but usually visual.
Eyes Lateral Left: Non-dominant hemisphere auditory processing - i.e., remembered sounds, words, and “tape loops” and tonal discrimination.
Eyes Down and Left: Internal dialogue, or inner self-talk.
The memory of seeing Anna falling lifeless to the floor.
The memory of her own voice, crying out in terror.
The heart-wrenching cycle of denial, regret and guilt played back through her inner voice.
And all of this is rendered through a fictional, computer-generated character in a fictional, computer-generated movie.
All of this was constructed, frame by frame, by the character animators figuring out Elsa’s visual portrayal.
HOLY FUCKING CHRIST, DISNEY.

onaveridiansea:

counterpunches:

peachdoxie:

I think it must be a thing that if you have ice powers and white hair that you must have a flashback to a painful memory involving the younger sister you love dearly that is done via transition through the eyes

Except I’ll bet anything that Elsa’s constantly lived her life in triggering flashbacks. Her entire way of life is structured around that moment, practically guaranteeing PTDS attacks and symptoms on a daily basis.

There’s never been one moment that she forgot and I’ll bet you fifty bucks she had an episode right here, too:

image

It happens much more quickly than the time in the ice castle, but let’s pause to remember how these things actually work. In real life and in real time, we don’t get flashback montages, people just get waves of crippling panic and fear that attack in an instant. It’s all happening in the breath of a second for Elsa. The instant she remembers why it can’t be like this all the time is because she sees Anna fall all over again (and again and again and again) and it sobers Elsa instantly. There’s a tiny sliver of abject fear in Elsa’s eyes as they widen before regret and sadness take over once more. But it’s there and it’s what strengthens her resolve to shut Anna out once more, even though it kills her. 

Emphasis mine.

It’s there. My god, it’s there.

Look closely. The focus of her eyes shift, while still looking at her sister. Her irises shift minutely to the side while her eyelids widen. Then she drops her gaze downward and further to the side, before lowering her eyelids again.

It’s only a sliver of a second, but it is there.

In succession, we have the following eye movements, and their related cognitive significance:

Eyes Straight Ahead, but Defocused or Dilated: Quick access of almost any sensory information; but usually visual.

Eyes Lateral Left: Non-dominant hemisphere auditory processing - i.e., remembered sounds, words, and “tape loops” and tonal discrimination.

Eyes Down and Left: Internal dialogue, or inner self-talk.

The memory of seeing Anna falling lifeless to the floor.

The memory of her own voice, crying out in terror.

The heart-wrenching cycle of denial, regret and guilt played back through her inner voice.

And all of this is rendered through a fictional, computer-generated character in a fictional, computer-generated movie.

All of this was constructed, frame by frame, by the character animators figuring out Elsa’s visual portrayal.

HOLY FUCKING CHRIST, DISNEY.

(Source: coldneverbotheredme)

racethewind10:

themysteryvanishing:

Confession: I started this post shortly after Warehouse 13’s season 4 finale and I was so caught up in feelings I couldn’t think properly, and even now, I still can’t think properly but I just…ugh. THIS SHOW. THESE CHARACTERS. I love everyone so much. SO before you read, just know, most of this was me spastically feels-vomiting everywhere and even this doesn’t do it justice. The end.
I remember reblogging a post on here shortly after the finale aired, about how a newer generation of Warehouse agents is gradually filling the shoes and roles of those before them, and it was said that Myka would be like the new Artie, the brains of the Warehouse.
Read More

So as much as I love Claudia and Artie’s dynamic I equally love Myka and Artie’s dynamicbecause Artie is the father figure Myka neededand Myka is the daughter Artie would have been proud to call his heir.
racethewind10:

themysteryvanishing:

Confession: I started this post shortly after Warehouse 13’s season 4 finale and I was so caught up in feelings I couldn’t think properly, and even now, I still can’t think properly but I just…ugh. THIS SHOW. THESE CHARACTERS. I love everyone so much. SO before you read, just know, most of this was me spastically feels-vomiting everywhere and even this doesn’t do it justice. The end.
I remember reblogging a post on here shortly after the finale aired, about how a newer generation of Warehouse agents is gradually filling the shoes and roles of those before them, and it was said that Myka would be like the new Artie, the brains of the Warehouse.
Read More

So as much as I love Claudia and Artie’s dynamic I equally love Myka and Artie’s dynamicbecause Artie is the father figure Myka neededand Myka is the daughter Artie would have been proud to call his heir.
racethewind10:

themysteryvanishing:

Confession: I started this post shortly after Warehouse 13’s season 4 finale and I was so caught up in feelings I couldn’t think properly, and even now, I still can’t think properly but I just…ugh. THIS SHOW. THESE CHARACTERS. I love everyone so much. SO before you read, just know, most of this was me spastically feels-vomiting everywhere and even this doesn’t do it justice. The end.
I remember reblogging a post on here shortly after the finale aired, about how a newer generation of Warehouse agents is gradually filling the shoes and roles of those before them, and it was said that Myka would be like the new Artie, the brains of the Warehouse.
Read More

So as much as I love Claudia and Artie’s dynamic I equally love Myka and Artie’s dynamicbecause Artie is the father figure Myka neededand Myka is the daughter Artie would have been proud to call his heir.

racethewind10:

themysteryvanishing:

Confession: I started this post shortly after Warehouse 13’s season 4 finale and I was so caught up in feelings I couldn’t think properly, and even now, I still can’t think properly but I just…ugh. THIS SHOW. THESE CHARACTERS. I love everyone so much. SO before you read, just know, most of this was me spastically feels-vomiting everywhere and even this doesn’t do it justice. The end.

I remember reblogging a post on here shortly after the finale aired, about how a newer generation of Warehouse agents is gradually filling the shoes and roles of those before them, and it was said that Myka would be like the new Artie, the brains of the Warehouse.

Read More

So as much as I love Claudia and Artie’s dynamic I equally love Myka and Artie’s dynamicbecause Artie is the father figure Myka neededand Myka is the daughter Artie would have been proud to call his heir.

dawniesummers:

coalitiongirl:

Willow and Warren come from similar beginnings, two kids branded as nerds and bullied until they crave control, crave power over people after years of powerlessness- and they find that in magic and in technology, in their ability to create facsimiles and alter the things they want. It’s in wiping Tara and Katrina’s minds, forcing them to be perfect only in their approval of their [ex-]lovers, it’s in how they resent Buffy when given a taste of power, it’s in how that power is a drug that brings them to greater and greater extremes until they’re willing to rape and kill without giving it a second thought.

And that’s why Warren is the perfect warmup band to Willow’s main act in Season 6, because contained within him is the same dark resentment for past injustices and the same gleeful embrace of disregard for those who care about him. Willow becomes Warren as the season progresses, Willow gets in touch with that same power and is drunk on it, and Willow’s reproof of Warren’s treatment of Katrina is a commentary on the wrongs she herself had committed re: Tara.

It’s vital to her arc that she recognizes this darkness, that she comes into contact with it again and sees that she isn’t all that different from Warren after all. And that’s what The Killer in Me does, more than anything- Willow literally turns into Warren and faces her own demons there and the person she’d very nearly become. And only once she can actually come to terms with those similarities can she overcome them at last.

 #it wasn’t just season 6 too - you could see her selfish/manipulative behavior popping up far before #like in s4 with willow’s my-will-will-be-done spell and also s3 with the delusting #other moments too where you see willow seize power and use magic to suit her wants #because she’s been without power for a long time and then she had it and it was easy #easier than handling things in a grown-up way #don’t get me wrong - i love willow #only thing i don’t love is that her s6 arc has a focus on magic as the source of her addiction #rather than a focus on her own controlling personality #where magic is just the mechanism that lets her use power #i don’t like it because it externalizes her problem #so yeah i think there was some missed opportunity there for a stellar interesting terrifying arc #and then a hard wonderful redemption arc in s7 which sadly we only got bits of because of the season’s focus on other characters #imagine how fantastic that would be!

(Source: dawniesummers-archive)

dealanexmachina:

If you think about it, Paul and Delphine aren’t that different, except for the fact that the narrative does a whole lot more to make Delphine likable than it does for Paul (shipper tendencies aside).

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dealanexmachina:

The 5 times Sokka forgot Toph was blind and the 2 times he didn’t.

See, this is another thing I love about this show. They do an ace job with Toph, treating her blindness as just another facet of her character, but they also show how the rest of the gang learns to adapt around her.

By framing it in the act of forgetting, they make a couple major statements. First is that Toph is so capable, the others actually forget she cannot see. Her blindness is far from a disability; it is actually the reason she is BETTER than everyone else. Second, by making fun of Sokka or Katara or even Aang for forgetting that she is blind, they’re saying that sometimes, even good people, people we love, can say and do hurtful things without meaning to, and it is their fault for not checking their privilege. Sure it is couched in humor, because Toph is freakin hilarious, but it is always the others’ fault for forgetting, and the writers always allow Toph to call them out on it, from overt actions to passing comments about the dark. Finally, by eventually turning the joke around by letting characters grow and Toph be wrong about assuming they have forgotten, the show is saying that, hey, you can all learn to deal with those differences. You can be cognizant of the limitations of others have that you don’t, without being assholes about it. And no, you aren’t too young to learn that now.

And that is one of the coolest things this show has ever done. Toph’s blindess is never something that makes her any less capable than Suki or Sokka. Instead, sight just becomes an ability not all people have, the same way element bending is an ability not all people have. Toph, Suki and Sokka grow to recognize the opportunites that come with each person’s set of abilities and work together to maxmize what they can do and let others compensate for what they can’t, and because of that, mere children are able to take down a huge Fire Nation fleet bent on mass destruction. For any kids watching, both the ones with physical and mental disabilities and the ones who don’t know how to act around them, that is a huge fucking lesson to learn.

(Source: lydiasgotstiles)

tumblnonymous:

racethewind10:

fuckyeahpikacha:

damianodefense:

i don’t accept any of this. i don’t accept that helena would ever try for a normal life. i don’t accept that helena would ever want to settle down with a man and a child. i don’t accept that helena would be that cold to myka. i don’t accept that helena would care more about saving a kid than she would myka. i don’t accept that helena would care more about a guy she’s only known for six months than a woman she’s known for years, a woman who has literally saved helena from herself. i don’t accept that helena could willing let the woman who knows her better than anyone else go. i don’t accept that helena would let myka walk away from her. i don’t accept this. i can not and i will not accept it. fuck all of you in the writers room.

I DO NOT ACCEPT THAT HELENA G WELLS - WOMAN SUFFRAGIST WHO LOVED MYKA BECAUSE SHE IS THE KIND OF WOMAN IN THE PRESENT THAT HELENA WANTED TO BE IN THE PAST - WOULD GIVE UP HER DREAMS OF WOMEN DOING AMAZING THINGS [WAAH, WORDS ESCAPE ME] FOR THIS LIFE OF DOMESTICITY

Except that its NOT H.G. Wells. You guys she is literally NOT HERSELF. Its more than just the need to hide her initials. She could have been “Helena Wells” and not raised suspicion. She chose the name that was IN NO WAY HER. 

The thing people keep forgetting I think is that HELENA IS STILL NOT OK. She is STILL not over the death of her daughter and SHE AND MYKA HAVE NEVER ACTUALLY FUCKING DISCUSSED WHAT THEY ARE TO EACH OTHER. So here is this connection between these two women, strong enough TO STOP ONE FROM DESTROYING THE WORLD, and then again, to get her to SACRIFICE herself to save Myka (and the world) again, but she never has any time to deal with that connection, to come to terms with what it means. 

The last time Helena felt that strongly about someone that someone was murdered and HELENA KIND OF TRIED TO BLOW UP THE WORLD. 

So now we see “Emily Lake.” And Emily Lake is boring and normal. Emily Lake loves a safe man and has a daughter and a boring job and she gets driven to work every day. BECAUSE THAT IS AS FAR AWAY FROM THE WAREHOUSE AND MYKA AS SHE COULD GET. It is SO far away from a love that probably scares the shit out of her, a relationship that - as much as I think Helena WANTS it - is STILL in her mind tied up with TRYING TO (but being talked down from) ENDING THE WORLD. 

And remember, Artie may have TOLD her about sacrificing herself to save the Warehouse but she didn’t LIVE it. FOR HELENA G. WELLS, STRONG EMOTIONS STILL MAKE HER DANGEROUS TO THOSE AROUND HER, ESPECIALLY THOSE PEOPLE SHE LOVES. 

So yeah. H.G. Wells would NEVER do the things we saw in this episode. 

BUT as far as I’m concerned, that WASN’T H.G. Wells. That was Helena, trying SO VERY HARD to run from herself. 

And she’s going to fail. 

And she’s going to go back to her truth. Which is the Warehouse and Myka. 

And until the final episode airs I refuse to believe otherwise. 

headcanon accepted.

"The whole sad point is nobody would notice if I died."

Oh, okay, wow so this quote is basically amazing and here’s why:

“The whole sad point is nobody would notice if I died.” That’s it. That’s Sarah and what she thinks of herself at the beginning of the show. No one would notice. That’s why she left [insert fictional city name] at the drop of a hat - she thought so little of herself that she figured leaving wouldn’t affect anyone. And, I suspect, she went with Vic because she thought he was the only one who did care, and put up with a lot of his shit because of this belief.

But people did notice, a fact that comes crashing back down on Sarah when she sees Felix, Kira, and Mrs S again. She’s cast herself as a loner, but she does have people who love and care about her, and it’s in incurring the wrath of their anger/hurt/disappointment that she finally starts to figure this out. Her existence does matter, it is unique to the universe and there are people out there who would notice if she disappeared.

AND THEN. AND. THEN. (this is where the show starts to blow my mind)

IT TURNS OUT SHE’S A CLONE.

“Nobody would notice if I died.”

If you’re a clone - one of god knows how many - it’d be so easy to come to this conclusion. What’s tragic about Sarah is that she decides this before she finds out she’s a clone (Alison, on the other hand, comes to this after, “I’m not even a real person!”)If Sarah dies, someone else who looks exactly like her could theoretically step into the void. No one would notice.

Except people do notice when Sarah’s clones try to take her place. Look at Kira. She knew right away that Alison wasn’t Sarah. And though it seemed the wool had been pulled over Mrs S’ eyes, she noticed too.

Sarah believes her life’s interchangeable with any other human on the planet. Orphan Black has set out to prove the exact opposite, by giving Sarah foils who are literally interchangeable with her. Even though there are maybe hundreds of people who share her face, the world would notice if Sarah Manning disappeared. It has before, and every interaction, every time a clone impersonates another clone, it becomes clearer. No one is like Sarah and everyone knows it. This show is proving Sarah wrong by using people who are genetically identical to her. Holy shite.

And now for something tragic – let’s take a look at Beth. Oh, my dear Beth. No one notices that she dies. Paul. Art. Cosima. Alison. None of them notice that Beth isn’t Beth right away. These are arguably the people closest to her and they don’t have a clue. Yes, they do catch up eventually. The fact that they don’t notice might be more of a testament to Sarah’s mimicry skills than anything else; then again, Alison did a pretty great job mimicking Sarah and it still didn’t fly. Sarah’s Beth ruse doesn’t end because people notice – it’s because she gets tired of it, or she messes it up in a way. Mind you, the way she messes up isn’t related to not being Beth. It’s related to being Sarah. The Clash. The accent. Fingerprints. For fuck’s sake, Helena walks into the precinct pretending to be Beth and no one can tell. At most, they think she’s had a bad day.

Whereas Sarah thinks no one would notice if she died, for Beth it’s actually true. Ow. Ow ow ow.

It’s a specific choice to have Sarah slip into Beth like this, then. Because as the show’s trying to prove to Sarah that, yes, people would notice if she died, it’s also presenting the opposite scenario to her. She’s the one proving that no one noticed Beth leaving. So can you blame her for thinking the same of herself?

TL;DR This show isn’t about clones at all. It’s about wondering if your existence matters to the world.

(via cywlyxn)

jackviolet:

I felt that Rumpelstiltskin’s relationship with the women in his life and in the show deserved its own entry.

Although I do not wish to discount the evil that Regina has indeed done—she has killed, manipulated, stepped over and devastated many, many people—it is getting to be ever-more clear that…

priheymadonna:

There has been quite a lot of debate lately in the “Once Upon A Time” fandom about the way the show touches upon issues like rape, abuse, murder etc, or the way that adoption is portrayed. However, in most discussions it becomes clear that the female characters in OUAT are subject to much more criticism than their male counterparts.

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Okay but can we also talk about how Gold’s attitude towards Henry proves once and for all that his motivations in finding Nealfire were purely selfish?

He did not want to reunite with his son for the sake of his son’s happiness, well-being, or redemption. He wanted to reunite with him for the sake of resolving his own daddy issues.

I mean, not only is Henry his grandson (biologically speaking) he is the son of the person he has been desperately searching for, supposedly to make amends. To right his wrongs. As much as I hate that this is an actual storyline, Nealfire is obviously enamored with his newfound offspring. Henry’s existence makes him happy. So Gold should, in theory, be happy that Neal is happy, so he should be happy that Henry exists.

The thing is, that theory is based on Gold actually wanting Neal’s happiness, not just his own. What he actually wants from Bae is not love and redemption, it’s an outlet to deal with his issues about his own father being absent. That’s why he wanted to make Neal fourteen again. He wanted to raise a child to be the father he never had, and to escape the consequences of his actions in choosing power over his son. It’s All About Him, never about anyone else.

The amount of fictional men who see their children as tools to deal with their own daddy issues, instead of their own people with their own needs and desires, is staggering. And yet I’m supposed to sympathize with them.

why

gabbysilang:

tokkinwonderland:

A lot of people are saying that Liu should’ve been Sherlock instead of Watson. And they’re right, it would’ve been awesome for all the reasons they list. But here’s my two cents about why I’m super happy that she’s Watson instead.

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“And for me, it’s so much more important that she’s Watson instead of Holmes because of what Watson represents as a character. Watson is the one of the most famous literary examples of the every-man, the audience surrogate, the person meant to be identified with. Because of the rich literary history of the character, there’s an immediacy and cognitive understanding of how the audience is fundamentally supposed to relate to the character. For an Asian-American to be cast in the role as the “ordinary American,” as sad as it is, for me is ground-breaking and means a lot.”

PREACH

PREACH

PREACH

the-silence-in-between:

After re-watching “The Cricket Game”, I feel the need to defend Snow White and her attempt to redeem Regina.  I’ve seen a lot of criticism around Tumblr of the chance that she gave Regina, calling it essentially a shallow and seriously flawed attempt at rehabilitation.  This is a totally true statement.  However, I’ve also come to the conclusion that Snow did the best in this situation that she could with the resources available to her.

Snow, in this episode, is much like a little girl who has broken her mother’s favorite vase, a gift from a late loved one.  She didn’t mean to break it, but she did, and she’s desperately trying to put the pieces back together so that Mommy won’t be angry anymore, but she’s a little girl, and she doesn’t have any glue.  She’s not equipped to put anything back together.

We’ve discussed in the once upon a meta tag about how what Regina really needed after Daniel’s death was therapy, or some kind of other professional psychological help so that she could work through the abuse that she’d suffered and heal and become healthy again.  The problem, though, is that it would appear that psychology, therapy, and rehabilitation do not exist in Fairytale Land.  I mean, this is a realm ruled by absolute monarchs who can have anyone executed if the whim strikes them (see: George and Charming).  If you piss off the monarch, you get executed; there is no system of rehabilitation set up here.  And the closest you can get to a psychotherapist is Jiminy Cricket, but in this world, he’s just a conscience — he hasn’t gotten his Ph.D. from the curse yet, and it shows.  In Storybrooke, one of the first things that Archie does after the curse breaks is to go to Regina and offer her his services.  In FTL, though, he tells Snow and Charming that “I fear the queen will never change.”  Whereas Archie believes in Regina and her capacity for change, Jiminy does not; to him, as to virtually all others, she is a lost cause.

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gnomingabout:

Can I just take a moment to spam this post with how important I find Ruby’s character to be—she’s the Charmings’ right hand.

When Snow, Charming, and Emma are all incapacitated who did Grumpy run to with news? Red—because she’s the leader in their absence, because she would take action, she would do her best to make things right. We’ve seen how close she is to the Charming family; she’s the kind of friend who would take on an entire fleet of knights by herself to give Charming a chance to get away and save Snow, she’s the friend Emma and Snow trusted Henry with when they went to banish the Wraith, she’s at every single FTL strategy meeting back when they were first pitted againt the Evil Queen and acting as a militia group, and she stepped into a leadership role after the curse was broken by helping set up the find-me flyer board and using the diner as a gathering point (it even looked like she had a better handle on things then Charming himself). 

Ruby is a key player in the Charming hierarchy, she is one of their most trusted allies, and when there was trouble in the New World, what did she do? She looked for counsel from Henry because he’s the heir. In that moment he was the last member of the royal family and she respects that so much. Look at the way she’s regarding Henry in this gif set, I implore you. She will serve the Charming family, Snow’s family, until she dies. She would give her life for these people, because Snow gave her a reason to believe she has a life worth living. 

And when they go back to FTL, the kingdom will be ruled just and fairly by the Charmings, and they will appoint a new guardian of the Enchanted Forest, one who sings to the moon and wears the boldest colored cloak; she will be the Red Huntress. 

(Source: booasaur)